Summer of Data Science 2017: Wrap-up

Posted on August 15, 2017, at 16:38:18. It was Tuesday.
Categorized in personal, professional • Tagged with data science, python, computer vision, imaging, machine learning, deep learning, nvidia, gpu, online courses, teaching, education, cat detector, generative adversarial networks, latent subspace, manifolds, bioimaging, grant writing, running

tl;dr

Mixed bag.

The Long Version

Something that's stuck with me from my middle school obsession with the Wing Commander books and video games was this quote:

No battle plan survives contact with the enemy.

Certainly as true as ever with the admittedly extremely ambitious …


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Summer of Data Science 2017

Posted on May 31, 2017, at 23:03:42. It was Wednesday.
Categorized in personal, professional • Tagged with data science, python, computer vision, imaging, machine learning, deep learning, nvidia, gpu, online courses, teaching, education, cat detector, generative adversarial networks, latent subspace, manifolds, bioimaging

A few days ago, while I was still in Portland, OR enjoying the last few days of PyCon 2017, Renee (@BecomingDataSci) mentioned on Twitter that she might bring back the "Summer of Data Science" she kicked off last year.

In short: use the summer as an opportunity to learn and …


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So, you want to conduct research with me?

Posted on March 16, 2017, at 15:59:21. It was Thursday.
Categorized in professional • Tagged with phd, graduate school, research, mentoring, computer science, graduate student

Deviation #1: This is wholly separate from the "should I get a Ph.D." question. For that I would recommend one of numerous guides that ask all the right questions.

Deviation #2: This is also wholly separate from how to succeed in a Ph.D. program, though there is some …


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Game-ify Your Raspberry Pi

Posted on January 06, 2017, at 18:47:37. It was Friday.
Categorized in personal • Tagged with pi, raspberry pi, retropie, retro, gaming, video games, nvidia, shield, steam

My project over the 2016 holiday season was to take the Raspberry Pi 3 I've had sitting around the house idling for the previous nine months and turn it into a RetroPie-ified gaming emulator.

RetroPie is a phenomenal bit of software that combines the work of several projects into a …


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Open Science in Big Data (OSBD) Workshop

Posted on September 26, 2016, at 09:10:19. It was Monday.
Categorized in professional • Tagged with workshop, big data, ieee, open science

Back in May of this year, some of the other computer science professors and I put together a proposal for a workshop. The workshop would be in conjunction with the December 2016 IEEE BigData Conference, and would focus specifically on the intersection of big data and open science.

In June …


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A twitterbot for posting weekly running stats

Posted on May 16, 2016, at 15:09:59. It was Monday.
Categorized in personal • Tagged with howto, python, strava, running, oauth, tweepy, twitter, pybot

We runners (we're a crazy bunch), for the most part, like our stats. How many miles do you log each week? Each month? How are your average race paces trending? Are your long runs both feeling good and getting faster?

Yes, we're a little obsessed with our numbers.

It's no …


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Reviewing a reviewed grant's reviews

Posted on February 02, 2016, at 10:18:34. It was Tuesday.
Categorized in professional • Tagged with academia, grants, reviewer feedback, rejection

Rejection in any context sucks. As a new faculty trying to prove himself (to himself, but most importantly, to his tenure committee), I particularly hate rejections in the context of grant proposals and paper submissions. The "nice" thing about the latter rejection is that it's marginally easier to resubmit a …


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Introductions

Posted on November 07, 2015, at 12:14:02. It was Saturday.
Categorized in personal • Tagged with pelican, python, github, jupyter

Well, this seems to be working. Kinda.

I took some inspiration from Jake VanderPlas' Pythonic Perambulations and opted for a similar route: Pelican as the backend blogging machine, github as the host, and (eventually) embedded Jupyter notebooks. Unfortunately, Jake's addition to the Pelican plugins to allow Jupyter notebooks uses CSS …


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